ladyseishou: (Default)
[personal profile] ladyseishou
I know pretty much what my main characters are like, but beyond that I just have to wait to see what comes out of my typewriter. I make up one-third of the things people say and do in the stories I write, but I have nothing to do with the rest.

Rex Stout (author of the Nero Wolfe mystery novels)


Do your characters take over your novel, Nano Writer? Or do they follow the path you've set out in your outline?

Have you met the characters in our newest contest? Part one closes this Sunday, June 14!

Sources for the genre mini-challenge may be found here. Do you agree/disagree with the genre? Did any of the answers surprise you?

Keep writing, Nano Writer!
ladyseishou: (Default)
[personal profile] ladyseishou
Robert McKee in his work Story describes a story scene as:

…an action through conflict in more or less continuous time and space that turns the value-charged condition of a character’s life on at least one value [positive or negative] with a degree of perceptible significance.


Image and video hosting by TinyPic

So_what’s_your_scene_Nano_Writer? )
ladyseishou: (Default)
[personal profile] ladyseishou
Apparently, many of our Nano Writers (whether of the blue or purple persuasion) have a passionate interest in the topic of genre and my thanks to everyone who commented on the earlier post!

What exactly genre means is open to a degree of interpretation…

tired_retread_or_playful_subversion? )
ladyseishou: (Default)
[personal profile] ladyseishou
With story idea (or two) in hand, we next consider genre, Nano Writer. Wikipedia defines genre as: a term for fictional works (novels, short stories) written with the intent of fitting into a specific literary genre in order to appeal to readers and fans already familiar with that genre.

NaNoWriMo hosts an entire subforum of "lounges" for genre writers yet the idea of genre fiction is rejected by many writers as being too restrictive and formulaic.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

So Nano Writer, the question this week: Do_you_genre? )
ladyseishou: (Default)
[personal profile] ladyseishou
So now that we've put that place in Schenectady out of business, what do some other writers say about where the ideas come from...

Neil Gaiman (American Gods and Coraline) reports that when asked, he would say:

"From the Idea-of-the-Month Club," I'd say, or "From a little ideas shop in Bognor Regis," "From a dusty old book full of ideas in my basement," or even "From Pete Atkins."

But now-a-days, tired of tomfoolery, he opts for telling the curious where his ideas really come from...click_here_for_more )
ladyseishou: (Default)
[personal profile] ladyseishou
Last week we looked at ways to jumpstart the writing habit by writing in a journal every day, and like a good distance runner, working up to your NaNoWriMo word count of 1,667 words a day.

Okay, show of hands, how many Nano Writers fell a little short of the target? Wow. That's a lot of hands. But hey, that's okay! It's a new week! Let's see if we can't inspire a few more keystrokes and work that word count by finding something fun/cool/relevant/inspirational to write about and perhaps, maybe, stumble on a really great idea for your novel you're going to write in November.


Image and video hosting by TinyPic


So_do_you_know_about_that_place_in_Schenectady? )
ladyseishou: (Default)
[personal profile] ladyseishou
Most writers recognize that there are two types of conflict in their work: external and internal. Mary Connealy, an award-winning author of humorous novels that take place in the Wild West, says this:

Defining your conflict is Step One in writing your novel. What it boils down to is: External Conflict is plot, Internal Conflict is characters.

more_here )
ladyseishou: (Default)
[personal profile] ladyseishou
Without it there is No Story. No drama. No interest.

Janet Burroway, in her classic text Writing Fiction, a Guide to Narrative Craft (now in its seventh edition) claimed it to be the “fundamental element of fiction” though the playwright Elia Kazan referred to it simply as “two dogs fighting over a bone.”

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

What_is_it?_And_do_you_got_it_Nano_Writer? )
ladyseishou: (Default)
[personal profile] ladyseishou
So you say you want to write a novel. Better yet, you want to write a 50,000 word novel. And you want to do it in 30 days.

30 days!

That’s pretty scary stuff. 50,000 words. 30 days. So let’s break it down into something a little more manageable.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic


And_we_all_know_the_formula,_right? )

Profile

nano_writers: NaNoWriMo Dreamwidth Writers (Default)
NaNoWriMo Dreamwidth Writers

October 2017

S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15 161718192021
22232425262728
293031    

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags